The Asagi Koi

Asagi are one of the older Koi varieties with stunning coloration in an unusual pattern. Asagi are Koi that have light blue/grey bodies with their gill plates, abdomens, pectoral fins and tail fin that ideally should blaze red. Their white scales on their back though, edged with blue make these fish difficult to appreciate from

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The Showa Koi

The Showa is one of the big three of the Go Sanke Koi varietals (Kohaku and Sanke being the other two). It is most often confused with a Sanke, as the Showa is traditionally assumed to be a black Koi, white (shiroji) and red (hi) markings, whereas a Sanke is a white Koi with black

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The Sanke Koi

The Sanke is a quintessential Koi and one member of the big three of the Go Sanke Koi varietals (Kohaku and Showa being the other two). It is most often confused with a Showa, as the Sanke is traditionally assumed to be a white Koi, with black (sumi) and and red (hi) markings, whereas a

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The Kohaku Koi

The Kohaku koi is a much treasured and prized Koi and is one of the oldest varieties. It is a white koi with red (hi) markings. Ideally the white should be snow white and the red (hi) should be of an even color – often it is more orange than red. Kohaku are my personal

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Koi Pond Water Temperature

Temperature is one of the critical factors directly influencing every aspect of our Koi and pond life. Temperature has a direct bearing on metabolic rates of living organisms in the pond. It has a direct bearing on the health and growth of Koi, oxygen levels in the water as well as the oxygen consumption. There

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Part 6 – Fish and Man Together

Into this dynamic pond system we introduce two critical factors – fish and man. How can our Koi possibly survive in an environment that can become 100 – 200 times more alkaline / acidic, have a temperature change of more than 5C, have oxygen levels that can drop and rise dramatically, and have a shifting

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Part 5 – Ammonia

The levels of ammonia and toxicity of ammonia are never constant. These are closely related to your pH levels A few hours after feeding the ammonia level will rise as the nitrogen wastes of the fish are excreted. This can actually be measured. A measurement just before feeding should produce the lowest or no ammonia

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Part 4 – Temperature

On most occasions temperature will be lowest in the morning just before sunrise and the highest at sunset (unless your pond is built on a nuclear waste dump, which generates its own heat). Temperature is influenced by the amount of sun, the intensity of the sun the pond receives and other factors such as wind

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Part 3 – pH

In the morning the pH will be low compared to a test done in the late afternoon so it is important that you remain consistent with the times you check your levels. The buffering capacity of the water will play a major roles in the dynamic fluctuation of pH during the course of a day.

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Part 2 – Oxygen in a Koi Pond

Possibly the single most important element in pond water – and the most neglected aspect of Koi keeping. For life to exist in water there must be oxygen dissolved in it. Whilst there are around 210 000 part per million of oxygen in the atmosphere there are only around 8 parts per million in water

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